Interact Better with Your Customers via Social Media – Coming Soon in the 2012 Social Media Usage Study

J.D. Power is committed to helping companies understand and navigate the rapidly changing landscape of social media. To that end, the 2012 Social Media Usage Study has been piloted to examine how consumers are currently using social media to interact with companies and to understand the current social media practices companies employ. To continue looking at how companies interact with consumers via social media, we will be releasing the comprehensive study, collaborating directly with businesses and consumers, in January 2013 that fully examines why and how consumers engage with companies via social media.

In the meantime, take a look at the topline findings from the study pilot in the whitepaper titled “Understanding the Impact of Social Media on Companies.”

Download the Whitepaper

What else would you like to see out of this study?

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The Case for the Big Branch

By Jeffrey P. Marsico, Executive Vice President of The Kafafian Group, Inc

This post originally appeared on Jeff for Banks

I had a very interesting conversation with a bank client today. He called me to discuss, among other things, his bank’s expansion strategy. During the discussion, I mentioned that I had recently driven by one of his branches and that it was the biggest in town. What he said about it inspired this post.

Being the biggest branch in town, in terms of square footage, is not something cheered among industry pundits these days. Indeed, if I were to summarize the sentiment, it would be that future branches would be much smaller, but with big a** signs. Those were another bank consultant’s words, not mine.

This CEO isn’t buying it. He said that since that branch underwent a $1.5 million renovation, its deposits grew by 40%. In prior years its deposit totals had remained in a relatively tight band. He opined that it is “amazing what visibility, access, and egress” does for a branch. He also said that his business owner customers demanded a nearby branch.

But he did not think the branch had to be in the same town as the business. The next town over would due.

Now that makes sense to me. If it costs, on average, $600,000 per year in operating expenses to run a standard branch, wouldn’t it make sense to build a large, marquis-type branch in every other town that cost $800,000 per year? By abandoning the every town strategy, you effectively save $400,000 per year. Continue reading ›

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Small Business Banking Still the Red-Headed Stepchild

Our J.D. Power and Associates 2012 U.S. Small Business Banking Satisfaction StudySM  suggests that banks should focus on small business customers because of the value they represent, when compared to retail customers. On average, small businesses hold deposits four times greater and loan balances 15 times greater than retail banking customers.1 Small business customers also carry higher levels of personal banking business than the average consumer. In addition, the profit margins on small business customers are typically larger than those on larger corporate banking customers.

Yet, based on the results of the study, just released today, it appears that small businesses, like Rodney Dangerfield, get no respect. Despite overall satisfaction increasing by 19 index points year over year to 736 (on a 1,000-point scale) in this year’s study, it still represents one of the lowest-scoring financial services businesses that J.D. Power and Associates examines. Only mortgage servicing is lower. Even its perennial low-scoring counterpart, credit card, has surpassed small business banking in satisfaction to levels enjoyed in the retail banking sector.

Now in its seventh year, the study measures small business customer satisfaction with the overall banking experience by examining eight factors: product offerings; account manager; facility; account information; problem resolution; credit services; fees; and account activities.

The Small Stuff Matters
The study finds that when small business banking customers are greeted by name, the positive impact on overall satisfaction is 106 points. However, this occurs only 47 percent of the time, compared to 64 percent of the time among retail banking customers, representing a 17-percentage-point gap. This disparity occurs even though small business customers bank in person at the branch more than twice as often as retail customers (36 times vs. 16, respectively, on an annual basis). Continue reading ›

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Will You Bank On Us?

Best Banking Blogs of 2012

The Financial Brand, the premier online publication for bank and credit union marketers is conducting the second most important election this week; Best Banking Blog “2012 Readers’ Choice” awards.

Our J.D. Power and Associates Banking Blog, as part of having received the prestigious “Editor’s Choice” award,  is now nominated for the “Reader’s Choice” award  for Best Banking Blog of 2012.   Your vote counts, and we would be grateful for your support!

VOTE HERE

To be recognized alongside our friends and distinguished bank bloggers Jim Marous, Ron Shevlin, Brett King, Bradley Leimer, Matt Wilcox, JJ Hornblass, Liz Lum, Chris Skinner, Serge Milman, Christophe Langois, Jim Bruene, Randy Smith and Jim Van Dyke is an honor in itself.

Congratulations to all of our fellow nominees for your continued dedication and delivery of superb insights to our banking community.

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A Few Post Halloween Banking Tips &Treats

In case you missed a few of our recent online events and complementary research reports, we’re including them for you here.  We promise, just like the day after 1/2 price Halloween candy, it’s not a trick. Just a heartfelt way for us to treat you, our loyal banking fiends and fans for your continued supportEnjoy!

What Do Small Business Owners Expect From Their Bank?

This exclusive webcast provides an inside look into the results of our J.D. Power and Associates 2012 US and Canadian Small Business Banking Satisfaction Study that will be released next week.  Below are only some of the many issues discussed during the webcast:

  • How customers’ perceptions have changed since 2011
  • The latest trends emerging in the small business banking industry
  • Which factors are having the biggest impact on customer satisfaction

Download the full webcast

The Dividends of Improving Best Practices for Social Media Research

In this whitepaper, we’ll show you that without well-established and proven guidelines on query construction and data extraction, very different results and conclusions can be obtained by different analysts attempting the same social media data search.

In extreme cases, analysts can create such highly divergent queries that the associated data leads to different answers to even simple questions, such as:

  • Which brand is my main competitor?
  • Is Product1 more of my brand’s conversation this month centered around product?
  • Is the sentiment expressed toward my brand this month more or less positive than the sentiment expressed toward my brand last month?

Download the full whitepaper

Using Voice of the Customer Information to Improve Business Performance: 5 Keys to Success

This presentation explores how clients use J.D. Power and Associates and other Voice of the Customer data with ROI or other business metrics to analyze under-performance to drive improvement.

Download the full presentation Continue reading ›

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Are Bankers Ready For The Bank 3.0 Reality?

A Guest Post By:   Jim Marous, SVP of Corporate Development at New Control
In an exclusive interview about his newest book, Bank 3.0, Brett King discusses how change occurring in the banking industry is inevitable, speeding up and disruptive. From the mobile wallet wars to the impact of social media, tablets and the ‘de-banked’ and digital consumer, Bank 3.0 shows why banking is no longer a place you go to, but something you do.

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A great deal has happened since Brett King wrote Bank 2.0 in 2010. Two years ago, banks were under siege as the foundation of the banking system was close to collapse and the image of the industry as a safe and secure environment was being challenged. The impact of social media was just beginning to be understood by the financial services industry and mobile technology as we know it today was in its infancy. Heck, King even referenced his (now long gone) Blackberry in the first chapter of Bank 2.0.

With Bank 3.0, King discusses how consumers are less likely to view their retail banking provider in terms of capital adequacy, branch network, products and rates. Instead, customers are more likely to determine their banking partners by how easily they can access their accounts when they need to, and how much they trust their provider to execute business on their behalf. For those who read Bank 2.0, King’s new book retains some of the foundation and case studies, but updates several areas based on what has occurred (and will be occurring) relative to digital delivery, payments, social media, and the power of ‘big data’.

On the eve of the introduction of Bank 3.0 in the U.K. (introduction in the U.S. is scheduled for early November), I interviewed Brett King about his new book and about how he views the banking industry today. 

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What has occurred in the marketplace that warranted the publishing of Bank 3.0 just 2 years after your successful book, Bank 2.0?

Brett King: The marketplace has changed significantly around how consumers are engaging with their financial institutions. Compared to two years ago, traditional banks are challenged more than ever from a distribution perspective because of the movement to mobile and digital channels, and because they are not well positioned with their current bricks and mortar networks for a positive customer experience. The philosophy of banks, with their secure firewalls, operational structure and compliance mindset, is counter to how any other industry engages with customers in the digital space. Since Bank 2.0, the competitive environment has also changed a great deal, with partnerships being developed, alternative players and new bank start-ups being introduced, underbanked segments emerging, and social media merging with bank service engagement. People are beginning to take a functional and utility view of banking, which is why I say in the subtitle of the new book, ‘banking is no longer a place you go to, but something you do’

Continue reading ›

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What Do Small Business Owners Expect From Their Bank?

With the fluctuating economy and new banking regulations continuing to affect the expectations that small business owners have of their banking experiences, financial institutions need to be armed with the insights that can help them meet and exceed these expectations. They need to know:

  • How customers’ perceptions have changed since 2011
  • The latest trends emerging in the small business banking industry
  • Which factors are having the biggest impact on customer satisfaction

Our J.D. Power and Associates 2012 US and Canadian Small Business Banking Satisfaction Studies will provide these insights and much more!

Join us for an exclusive webcast during which we will give you an insider’s look into the results of these studies!

Webcast Details:

DATE:  Tuesday, October 30

TIME:  2:00 – 3:00 PM ET

SPEAKER:  Jim Miller, Senior Director, Banking Practice at J.D. Power and Associates

 

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Peering Into the Future

A Guest post By Banking.com

Online banking carries with it the same question that accompanies every aspect of human activity moving online: Is it simply a more convenient way to do what we’ve always done, or is something new, particularly in the sense that we can do more, and therefore will do more?

There’s obviously no simple answer to this—the very act implies a level of customization that rules out any all-purpose conclusion. But if we still don’t know everything, what we do know now that we didn’t know even a couple of years ago?

A recent report from Javelin Strategy & Research has some answers, and they’re not particularly pleasant. Here’s the gist: Too many financial institutions still view online banking as the completion of a circle—consumers and (and maybe businesses as well conducting transactions, only doing it faster and more easily than by going to the bank. Javelin emphasizes that this “approach to online banking and bill pay has reached saturation because it is outmoded and unappealing in an era of customer-controlled interactive finance.” And that’s not all. Instead of new, technology-driven offerings drawing more business, Javelin theorizes, it might be even be a handicap: “The banking industry’s stale approach to online banking and bill pay leaves FIs particularly vulnerable to losing the 11% of consumers who are likely to switch primary FIs this year.”

The fundamental problem is the role of the bank in the equation—is it now simply a facilitator, the same way a basic piece of technology might be, or does it have more to offer? Continue reading ›

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Understanding Actual vs. Intended Customer Attrition

Did you know that customers who INTEND to switch primary financial institutions have the greatest value?

Bank customer attrition rates, both actual and intended, continue to increase. According to data from our J.D. Power and Associates 2012 US Retail Banking Satisfaction Study, intended attrition has increased significantly to 12.9% from 10.7% in 2011 after having decreased from 2010 to 2011. The actual attrition rate has steadily increased since 2010, reaching 9.6%(1) this year.

By bank size, Midsize Banks have the highest attrition rate (11.3%), followed by Regional Banks (10.3%); Big Banks (10.0%); and Small Banks and Credit Unions (7.4%).(2) While most customers who switch leave one Big Bank for another Big Bank (29%), 19% of customers switch from a Big Bank to a Small Bank or Credit Union, demonstrating customers’ willingness to trade the convenience of a large banking network for the personal service of a local small banking network or credit union.

Notes: Actual AttritionRate is based on the 2012 Financial Services Screener

Continue reading ›

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Satisfaction With Social Media Interaction

Social media, a non-traditional method of customer interaction is clearly becoming increasingly important for banks to understand.

It’s no longer just a vehicle for customers to vent about poor experiences, praise their bank for exceeding expectations, or read about other customers’ positive or negative experiences—it has now become a legitimate service channel!

Social media sites not only allow customers to interact with their bank, but also provide another medium to converse with representatives, get questions answered, and resolve problems. For example, data from our 2012 J.D. Power and Associates US Credit Card Customer Satisfaction Study shows that during the past 12 months, 5% of credit card customers have contacted their issuer through their social media site to ask a question, resolve a problem, or make a request.

Although many questions or problems may need to be handled outside of the social media site that was the initial contact, it is important for banks to show they are listening to their customers’ “pain points” by providing an actual response to the social media posting.

Did you know that only 60% of customers who contacted their credit card issuer via social media received a reply?

Needles to say, the impact of replying to a posting on overall satisfaction is profound, as Interaction satisfaction among customers who have received a reply to their social media contact is notably higher than among those who did not receive a reply (802 vs. 748, respectively). Findings from our recent study also revealed that optimizing customer satisfaction with their social media experience does not end at merely responding to the request, but that issuers should continue to focus on the following:

  • Resolving the initial issue at hand
  • Offering additional assistance
  • Thanking the customer for their business

When each of these best practices are met, Interaction satisfaction increases to 839, which is 91 points higher than when they are not met.

Source: J.D. Power and Associates 2012 US Credit Card Satisfaction StudySM    

The Bottom Line:

With the continued advancement of technology shifting the way customers interact with financial institutions, it is vital for banks to proactively respond to the changing demands of their self-service channels and understand the importance of being responsive to feedback posted on social media sites.

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