3 Habits of High Ranking Customer Service Champions

We’d like to share with you a short video featuring elite companies recognized as J.D. Power 2012 Customer Service Champions.  They all describe their stories with one common theme, and that is the importance of assuring consistency across service channels.  In this video, you’ll hear from:

Chip Dufala, Erie Insurance – Executive Vice President, Services Rob . . . Continue Reading 3 Habits of High Ranking Customer Service Champions

Beyond Statisfaction: 2012 Customer Service Champions

 For some banks, good is no longer good enough. These companies have become Champions by going beyond satisfaction and exceeding their customers’ expectations, to not only win market share and maximize financial performance, but also raise the bar for other companies, both within and outside their industry.

Congratulations to the following financial services companies who . . . Continue Reading Beyond Statisfaction: 2012 Customer Service Champions

Why Complacency is NOT Customer Service

This past weekend, I visited an actual bank branch for the first time in over 6 months. As part of the MTV generation (the late half of course), I witnessed the introduction of the home computer, the growth of the video game era, the boom of cable television and the construction of the information superhighway we refer to as the internet. Growing up on digital technology, it’s probably not a shocker that I prefer to do much if not all of my banking via online channels whenever possible or available.

So, it was a Saturday morning, and I needed to cash a check written on a large regional bank where I am currently not a customer. Finding a branch location was a synch, as this bank has a huge national footprint with a well-recognized and distinguished brand image. Convenience was definitely key for me, so I went with easy, and chose to visit the small branch close to my home. After all, I had passed it a thousand times on my way to somewhere else, but never had a reason to pop in.

As I entered the branch, nobody acknowledged my presence, but finding the teller line was easy……4 steps and I was already inside the roped off area waiting for a teller to motion to me that it was my turn to be assisted. In less than a minute, I got the combo hand signal and slight arm waive to “come on down”, and was greeting with a hearty “hello” by the teller. I told her I wanted to cash a check, and she promptly asked me for identification. As she processed my transaction, counted and double counted the cash she was about to hand me, I took a few moments to glance around the rest of the office to just soak up the atmosphere. I can’t help it. I’ve done thousands of retail bank and branch assessments over the years, so you could say that I’m almost conditioned to automatically make note of wait times, observe service behaviors of branch staff and read non-verbal cues of branch customers. In fact, according to the 2010 J.D. Power Retail Banking Satisfaction Study, the in-person customer experience is the largest contributing factor to Account Activity satisfaction in the entire Study!

Here’s what I observed:

  1. One customer was waiting to be helped on the platform while a CSR was training another CSR on the computer system. Did I mention that it was a Saturday? Did I mention that there was only one CSR on duty?
  2. There were no customers in line at the teller counter, yet there were 3 other tellers on duty chatting amongst themselves. Did I mention that they were chatting behind the teller counter right in front of the customer waiting to be helped on the platform?

The teller finished processing my transaction, handed back my ID with the cash and a receipt and said “thank you”.

Here’s what I wondered:

  1. Why didn’t the teller thank me by name or use my name at all during the transaction? After all, she had my ID, so she knew my name by now.
  2. Why didn’t the teller ask me if there was anything more she could assist me with? I was thinking the obvious, like why was I not already a bank customer or inquire if I would like to be. Why didn’t they want me as a customer? Did they already have too many?
  3. Why wasn’t I greeted by anyone when I entered the branch?
  4. Why was platform training being facilitated on a Saturday with no other platform staff present?
  5. Why was a customer waiting to be helped when almost all employees in the branch were visibly available?

Now, I know what you’re probably thinking……I’ve been conducting comprehensive branch assessments for over 15 years, so how could I possibly be unbiased in my branch observations? I’m trained to notice the subtleties of customer service and can help banks build and implement customer satisfaction programs in my sleep, so maybe my observations were exaggerated or just too critical? Well in this case, I was just an average bank customer processing a simple transaction on a Saturday morning. Continue reading ›

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