Understanding ‘Virtual-Only’ Retail Banking Customers

With increased functionality such as mobile phone check deposits, online chat, envelope-free ATM deposits, and image-enabled ATM receipts, retail banking customers are able to fully manage their account without ever stepping into a branch or contacting the call center. While this can create significant cost savings by reducing branch traffic and decreasing the number of calls to the call center, there is also a considerable downside, based on findings from the 2014 J.D. Power Retail Banking Satisfaction Study.

Despite having similar demographics and product portfolios, self-service customers—those who have interacted only via remote channels during the past 12 months for routine transactions—are not only less satisfied with their banking experience, but are also less committed than are those who have visited a branch or called the call center during the past 12 months for routine transactions. Further, self-service customers tend to be less engaged and, in fact, are often indifferent toward their bank, as a larger percentage of self-service customers say they “probably will” or “probably will not” recommend, reuse, and switch, compared with assisted customers.

Banks that are able to elevate customer commitment levels[1] among self-service customers can benefit from improved overall financial performance. Specifically, banks that convert 2% of customers with low commitment and 5% of those with medium commitment into customers with high commitment stand to gain $1.68 million in interest revenue from greater deposits, investments, and loans per 100,000 customers[2].

Analysis of study data also finds that some banks are currently more successful at satisfying their virtual-only customers. For example, as displayed in the chart below, Bank K has the lowest overall satisfaction score amongst its virtual-only customers (720 on a 1,000-point scale). Meanwhile, Bank H has the largest percentage of virtual-only customers within their population (40%), making it especially critical for them to improve the overall experience of virtual customers.

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Self-service customers have different priorities and needs than assisted customers, which makes it essential for financial institutions to adjust their strategy in servicing these customers. Recommendations for additional areas of focus include:

  • If you got it, flaunt it; if you don’t got it, get it. Channel features are important to this segment, and while banks often do offer the features customers want, many are unaware of them, so it is important to ensure features/services are fully marketed. Furthermore, banks should continually look to add features to meet the changing needs of customers and, in turn, to remain competitive.
  • Be proactive, not reactive. Self-service customers place great importance on product offerings and tend to be critical of their bank’s value proposition; therefore, financial institutions need to proactively communicate with these customers and ensure they are aware of all product features/services and fully understand how and when fees will be incurred. Moreover, banks should consider implementing programs in which bank representatives and advisors proactively reach out to self-service customers to provide advice related to their financial needs.
  • If it’s broken, fix it. It is critical for banks to minimize the occurrence of problems. To achieve this, banks should focus on reducing the problems that not only have the greatest impact on satisfaction and retention, but also those that occur most frequently. Banks need to collect and analyze customer and employee data to determine root causes of problems and revise processes that are ineffective or problematic. Furthermore, banks have an opportunity to improve their rates of problem resolution via remote channels. The level of service that is provided via all channels needs to be optimum; however, banks need to pay close attention to service levels by remote channels (email/online chat) ensuring consistent and effective resolution of issues. Additionally, banks need to understand which problems can’t be fully resolved using a remote channel and revisit policies and procedures to improve the effectiveness of these channels.

[1] High commitment is defined as providing combined ratings of 17-20 points based on responses to the four commitment statements; medium commitment is defined as providing combined ratings of 12-16 points based on responses to the four commitment statements; low commitment is defined as providing combined ratings of 11 points or less based on responses to the four commitment statements.

[2] Assumes a 3% interest margin

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