Third-Party Auto Website Executives Offer Insight on Business Models

Automotive Marketing Roundtable 2013 DSC_4280-SThird-party automotive website executives offered their observations about vehicle price transparency during a panel discussion at the October J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable (AMR) in Las Vegas, NV. More excerpts from the panel discussion that was moderated by Joel Ewanick, former automotive marketing executive and now managing partner of Global Auto Systems, are highlighted in today’s post.

 Moderator: Joel Ewanick, managing partner, Global Auto Systems, Inc.

Panel Members:

Seth Berkowitz, president and COO, Edmunds.com

Larry Dominique, executive vice president, TrueCar, Inc.

Jared Rowe, President, Kelley Blue Book

Alex Vetter, senior vice president, Cars.com

Joel: You’re very different in how you collect your data—so tell me Seth (Edmunds) why is your data so much better than their data?

 Seth (Edmunds): “I guess we see ourselves across the panel as being least competitive with Cars.com. We respect what they are doing: with the classifieds industry and what they have done in used cars—that’s not really our core space. That might change in the future. I think our biggest differences are with TrueCar and with Kelley Blue Book. . . While we were the company 20 years ago that introduced invoice price, and published it for the first time, we’re actually moving in a completely different direction. . . We are going to have dealers provide actual prices on individual vehicles and then we are going to tell what other people are paying. We have our Price-Promise program, now where you get those actual prices. . . Over the coming months, you’re going to see invoice stripped off behind warning labels where you have to click to get it because we believe that it’s not servicing people anymore and it creates confusion.”

Alex (Cars.com): “Putting a price on a transaction that we know is wildly complex creates distrust in the industry. The expectation that this is the price you are going to pay—is not something that any website [represented] here can actually deliver because so much goes into the pricing at the retail store. We rely on dealer participation to drive that pricing.” Continue reading ›

Marketing Exec Leads Internet Site Panel in Discussing Price Transparency

Price negotiation for most consumers is often described as one of the most arduous parts of the purchase process, according to Joel Ewanick, managing partner of Global Automotive Systems, Inc. The former GM chief marketing officer led a panel discussion about “Vehicle Price Transparency” with four third-party website executives at the October J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable (AMR) in Las Vegas, NV. Excerpts from the panel discussion are highlighted in this post.

Moderator: Joel Ewanick, managing partner, Global Auto Systems, Inc.

 Panel Members:

Seth Berkowitz, president and COO, Edmunds.com

Larry Dominique, executive vice president, TrueCar, Inc.

Jared Rowe, President, Kelley Blue Book

Alex Vetter, senior vice president, Cars.com

Third-Party Website Leaders Define Business Models

Joel: I see that companies like yours are trying to help the consumer through the process. Can you explain what you do, what your business model is, and then we’ll start to compare and contrast?

Seth (Edmunds): “At Edmunds, we’re working through a major transition. For years, we’ve been an information and pricing authority. We probably have the largest repository of automotive information on the Internet with somewhere in the neighborhood of 3.5 million pages of content. We’ve decided that being this comprehensive encyclopedia of automotive information isn’t enough. . . We’ve decided to make car buying easier. We are going to do this by fostering trust—which is at an all-time low— between consumers and dealers.” Continue reading ›

Millennials Consume Content and Shop Differently

 Millennials consume content and shop in different ways from other generations and these Gen Y consumers are having a profound influence on the shopping behaviors of Gen X and Boomer buyers. Today’s post offers a few more excerpts about these younger consumers from panelists and presenters at the October J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable (AMR) in Las Vegas, NV.

What Does the Car Mean to Millennials?

“About 25% of millennials said they would buy a car sight unseen. They’d go online, find it, buy it and have it delivered. This is going to become a lot more important as we go along.”—Clayton Stanfield, senior manager, Dealer Outreach, eBay Motors

“For most of us, the car was the thing we wanted. The reality with millennials is that it’s probably a device they want first and foremost. A car is kind of a secondary consideration. Maybe it’s due to economics. Maybe it’s just due to how powerfully products have been marketed to them—like Xboxes and PlayStations. . . for auto manufacturers, a way to accrue loyalty and affinity to their brands is to get deeply immersed in offering the consumer some free content.”—Randy Shaffer, director, Xbox West Sales, Microsoft Continue reading ›

Experts Discuss how Millennials Consume Content, Shop Differently

AMR 2013 audienceReaching millennial consumers is a key focus for marketers in the auto industry, and was a key topic during presentations and panel discussions at the October J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable in Las Vegas, NV. A few highlights from a few sessions with panelists and presenters that addressed millennial consumers are presented.

“Let’s talk about millennials. . . They won’t get cable. They don’t have any money. They’re entitled. They want to do their own thing. They’re a completely digital first generation.”—Mike Shields, digital editor of AdWeek

How Different are their Media Consumption Habits?

“My team at Microsoft—80% of them are millennials—it’s an on-demand environment. They want to consume a lot of content at the same time. They can do it better than any other group. Some 83% are using a second screen and multi-tasking. . .You have to make sure you have something there to complement what they are consuming on TV.”—Randy Shaffer, director, Xbox West Sales, Microsoft

“We see ‘fanboys’ consuming media voraciously across all platforms. They go to five movies a month. They’re watching two more hours of television—on demand—than their own peer set. They’re consuming a ton of web video. In the case of gamers, they are willing to pay for content. They’ve been paying for $60 games for a very long time. . . You need to figure out how to present it to them. They will steal it first if they have to. But, if it’s good, they are willing to pay for it—that’s proven in gaming, premium video and web video content as well.”—Jay Sampson, executive vice president, sales and operations, Machinima Continue reading ›

J.D. Power Expert Discusses Digital Trends in Shopping for a New Vehicle

Arianne Walker

Arianne Walker

Arianne Walker, senior director of media and marketing solutions at J.D. Power, provided insights from J.D. Power’s latest research on the automotive shopping process during an opening review of “How Digital Living Impacts the Automotive Industry,” at the October J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable in Las Vegas, NV.

A prior post,  J.D. Power’s Roundtable Speaker Defines “Connected Auto Consumers” summarized Walker’s discussion of shopping trends by generation, statistics about visits to websites, in addition to explaining how AIUs (Automotive Internet Users) access information digitally. Today’s post includes more of Walker’s insight about automotive buyer online research behavior and the roles that social media and video play in the shopping experience. Continue reading ›

J.D. Power Roundtable Speaker Defines “Connected Auto Consumers”

Arianne Walker

Arianne Walker

Today’s digital lifestyle has a growing impact on the auto industry. Understanding how consumers who are in the market for a vehicle are “using digital information and how they are connected,” was a key focus in speeches and discussions at the recent J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable at the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, NV.

Arianne Walker, senior director of media and marketing solutions at J.D. Power, introduced the October conference with highlights of trends in automotive Internet usage based on J.D. Power research. She also spoke about the rise in digital media consumption and identified how different devices—smartphones and tablets—are being used to gather information mostly at home, but also on the go—smartphones are also used for auto shopping on the dealer lot. Walker also discussed trends in content with social media and video and how traditional companies are reformulating automotive content in new ways. Continue reading ›

J.D. Power’s Founder Focuses on Speed of Change during Casual Q&A

Jessica Migdol Garcia and founder J.D. (Dave) Power, III

Jessica Migdol Garcia interviews founder J.D. (Dave) Power, III, during a McGraw-Hill WINS Follow the Sun event in Westlake Village, CA.

In a recent Q&A interview at the J.D. Power office in Westlake Village, CA, founder J.D. (Dave) Power, III, spoke with Jessica Migdol Garcia, senior manager, business development, about a few memorable moments from the research firm’s history. He talked about the impact J.D. Power has had in improving the quality of products—especially cars and trucks—and said that a key challenge will be to manage consumer-focused digital research with the lightning speed of change due to the Internet. Continue reading ›

J.D. Power’s Roundtable Auto Exec Speakers Define New Marketing Strategies

Taking risks in marketing automotive products and basing strategies on rich data to broadcast content across many platforms were just two themes highlighted during speeches, panel discussions and presentations by automotive, marketing and digital experts at this week’s J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable (AMR) held at the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, Nev.

The Oct. 15-17 conference and networking event was attended by nearly 1,500 auto industry members, including OEM, dealership, search engine, and third-party website leaders. Some 40 corporations, led by Dealer.com and BrightRoll, along with companies such as eBay Motors, Cars.com, Nielsen, Pandora and LinkedIn, helped sponsor the annual comprehensive and future-driven conference. Continue reading ›

Building Loyalty, Improving Service are Keys to Satisfaction in Germany’s Auto Market

Mark_Lendrich

Mark Lendrich

In light of a less-than-robust outlook for new-vehicle sales in Germany during the next few years, automakers and dealers need to focus on loyalty, awareness of crucial factors that influence the purchase decision, and they need to improve service business, according to our 2013 Germany Vehicle Ownership Satisfaction Study (VOSS), a collaborative effort with AUTO TEST, the magazine in Germany for readers planning to buy a new car.

In 2013, overall satisfaction among owners of one- to three-year-old vehicles in Germany averages 789 points (on a 1,000-point scale). In the 2013 study, vehicle appeal, which accounts for 27% of the index weight, and ownership costs (25%) are the two key drivers of overall satisfaction. The remaining two factors evaluated and their weights are: vehicle quality and reliability (24%); and service satisfaction (23%). Continue reading ›

Social Media Usage Rises to Nearly Ubiquitous Levels in the U.S. Automotive Market

Tim_Dunne

Tim Dunne

Consumers have flocked to social media in recent years. According to the J.D. Power & Associates 2012 Social Media Usage StudySM, slightly more than 90% of U.S. adults who are online use a social networking site.

As a result of this consumer interest in social media, companies are racing to embrace the medium as well. According to Fortune magazine, 73% of Fortune 500 companies had an active Twitter account in 2012 (up from just 11% in 2011), and 66% of these companies maintain a corporate Facebook page (up from 8% in 2011).

Even with these high adoption rates, however, there is little consensus about how companies should maximize the opportunities social media provide, or what consumers are expecting to obtain from these interactions. Moreover, there is no clear direction about how to interact in a way that consumers prefer. The result is an online world of fragmented social media content and interactions, with companies searching to understand and fill the needs of consumers. Continue reading ›